Answers for a Healthier World

Return to blog
Harvey Pearce has more than 20 years of executive and leadership experience in the healthcare and finance industry and more than 25 years developing and running IT support organizations. Harvey has a consistent record of enhancing sales, margin, and profit growth in large organizations. Harvey is currently the Operational & Legacy Support Practice Vice-President for Leidos Health. In 4 years he has built the practice into a multi-million annual revenue stream, providing long term engagements for 100+ consultants and developing new services in the Healthcare market including, Clinical Service Desk, A/R rundown services and legacy data extraction and conversion. Harvey originally hails from England, UK but now resides in Texas with his wife and three children as a new citizen of the United States.

Legacy support engagements can be either disruptive or seamless to a hospital from a clinician’s perspective. The characteristics that determine one or the other fall solely on capabilities of the legacy support vendor and the quality of communication and legwork hospitals undergo before they start an engagement with their selected legacy support vendor. If the vendor and the hospital communicate poorly or have separate goals, the execution and completion of a project can be damaging to a clinician’s ability to perform their job.

Read more

Across most industries, legacy systems have become a challenge. They lower efficiency and can at times create regulatory concerns. They also create security gaps and lower the quality of service that customers have come to expect within an “always-on,” mobile world.

Read more

IT departments within hospitals are often stretched to their limits, especially when dealing with a new Electronic Health Records (EHR) implementation. The IT staff is focused on learning the EHR, implementing the new solution, and optimizing the solution after the launch in an attempt to perform improvements to the system. Additionally, by this point, most hospitals also require their IT staff to begin the onerous task of decommissioning existing legacy systems.

Read more

Healthcare organizations often rush the implementation process associated with their transition from a legacy system to a new Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR). Looking for a vendor to provide legacy support while the existing hospital IT staff pivots to learn and implement the new EHR is one area where time is required in order to perform the proper due diligence.

Read more

The expanded capabilities from modern Electronic Health Record solutions (EHRs) come with a cost increase in the implementation and adoption of the new system, as well as an increase in complexity for hospital staff. That often results in challenges for in-house hospital IT help desks after the launch of a new EHR system. By leveraging an EHR Clinical Service Desk (CSD), hospitals can better support clinicians while decreasing the complexity associated with new EHR implementations.

Read more

The launch of a new project such as an Electronic Health Records (EHR) system implementation is a major milestone for a hospital, and represents the culmination of significant investments of time, effort, and money. The success of the EHR launch and subsequent adoption by clinical staff will either have a positive or negative resounding impact on employees, the patients and the finances of a hospital. The consequences of an unsuccessful Go-Live are considerable — to the point where the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources & Services Administration recommends planning, testing, training and piloting the system before rolling it out.

Read more

When approaching a transition from a legacy system to a new Electronic Health Record (EHR) solution, hospital CIOs can find it a daunting process to know where to begin. It’s perfectly understandable. There is so much to consider, to plan for, and to budget, that finding the first step is often the most difficult part.

Read more

It’s a scary question for many hospital CIOs to answer. Are we ready for the legacy support team, who may already be on their way, to run our legacy systems? By the time hospital leaders ask themselves this question, it’s often too late. By then, hundreds of thousands of dollars have been spent, and the need for the in-house IT teams to pivot from running the legacy systems to focusing exclusively on implementing the new Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR) becomes painfully apparent.

Read more